Finding Our Ins-park-ration!

Nov 11/09/21

Parks are the heart and soul of Easton Park: when our neighborhood is complete, we’ll have more than 350 acres of green space and 13+ miles of trails! That’s why all of our neighborhood sections (and their flagship parks) have been inspired by famous parks from around the world. Of course, we put an Austin spin on them!

 

How Do You Name a Park?

We start by looking at the physical features and topography of the land. Are there are hills? A creek or water feature? Where is the section located—is it in the center of the neighborhood or on the edge?

Next, our creative team makes a list of amazing parks and their special features. We look at the size of the famous parks and how they fit into their communities. We research the amenities and architecture, as well as each park’s history. Is the name hard to pronounce? Is there anything around the park we could use to name the streets? Are there any fun play areas that could inspire our play areas? Is there already an area of Austin that shares the park name (Hyde Park, for example). Finally, our land and marketing teams get together and match up the land sections to the names. It’s hard work, but we try to make each one meaningful and appropriate for life here at Easton Park. Here are a few of our section names and the inspiration behind them:

 

Bryant Park

The Inspiration: Though many know Bryant Park for its former role as the home for New York Fashion Week, the Midtown Manhattan park is just as cherished for providing a green space for locals to eat lunch. It’s home to the main branch of the New York Public Library, a carousel, and a winter village that includes an ice-skating rink.

The Easton Park Version: Forgive us for getting a little nostalgic here—Bryant Park was the first section to open here at Easton Park! The park itself is still one of our most popular green spaces, with a hammock garden, giant chess, trike trails, playscapes, and a covered pavilion with culinary and grill stations! And it’s home to a lot of great memories—the Great Lawn here in Bryant Park was home to our first three Parkapaloozas!

Knob Hill

The Inspiration: San Francisco’s Nob Hill neighborhood isn’t exactly a park, but it is definitely a hill! Known for luxury mansions, great restaurants, and stunning views of the San Francisco Bay, Nob Hill is also home to several parks with fountains, green space, and walking paths.

The Easton Park Version: With amazing hilltop views of the entire neighborhood, Knob Hill Park is our favorite place in Easton Park to watch the sunset! To honor its San Francisco namesake, this park is home to the Easton Park Trolley, a repurposed Dillo trolley that used to carry people around downtown Austin. You’ll also find swings and a great hill for sledding.

Union Park

The Inspiration: Named for being the union of two main roads (Broadway and Bowery), Union Square Park in New York City is a lively hub that attracts professionals, students, and street artists. The urban park is known for community events and hosts many annual festivals as well as a daily green market known for fresh veggies and artisanal foods.

The Easton Park Version: Did someone say community events and festivals? Our Union Park also brings people together, often at The Union, our luxurious 14,000 sq. ft. amenity center featuring a club-style fitness center and resort-style pool. Union Park East and West offer park space and trails, including Easton Bark, our temporary dog park, which is coming soon!

 

Skyline Park

The Inspiration: With a beer garden and mini-golf in the summer and an outdoor ice-skating rink in the winter, Denver’s Skyline Park puts a lot of family-friendly activities into the middle of downtown.

The Easton Park Version: Because this neighborhood is home to the highest point in the Easton Park community, it only seemed appropriate to name it after a park in the Mile-High City. When complete, the views from the 21-acre flagship park will give Knob Hill a run for its money! And pocket parks and inter-connected trails throughout the section will give residents walkable access to The Union.

 

Kieke Park

The Inspiration: This section is a little different than most—it’s actually named for a family, not a park. The Kieke family owned much of the original land where Easton Park now sits. Lawrence and Gertrude Kieke married in 1917 and built a small frame house on their original plot of 40.5 acres. With the help of their five children—Lucille, Florene, Lois, Raymond, and Morris—the Kiekes enlarged their land holdings and ran a family cotton farm.

The Easton Park Version: The park in Kieke Park pays tribute to the Kieke family with a plaque that tells their story as well as stone monument benches engraved with their names. The logo for this section has a fig, which commemorates the fig trees that used to line the Kiekes’ property.

Discovery Park

The Inspiration: As the largest city park in Seattle, Discovery Park sits on the coastline overlooking Puget Sound, offering majestic views of both the Cascade and the Olympic Mountain ranges. With a lighthouse, trails, and a nature-inspired playground, the park is popular with visitors and locals alike.

The Easton Park Version: While we’re a little land-locked here in Central Texas, the spirit of discovery comes through! Our Discovery Park neighborhood offers trails, natural areas, and recreational park space, as well as 273 homesites ranging from 45 feet to 60 feet. Construction in this section has just started, but when complete, the 1.62-acre park in this section will offer a wide range of topographic features, from open undulating spaces to vista hilltops. Visitors will enjoy groupings of heritage oaks decked with treetop chimes, as well as a public art installation from renowned artist Beili Liu. Natural play opportunities will include a dry creek, dig zone, and sensory gardens.

Ready to live in a neighborhood that celebrates parks? Come for a visit and bring a picnic lunch! Or check out our available homes online.

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